Things you need to know for Living and Working in Switzerland 2021-2022

In 2022, Switzerland does not plan to change the work permit quotas for non-European Union/European Free Trade Agreement (non-EUFTA) nationals. Because of the pandemic, not many quotas have been used up. In addition, the country in the Alps needs specialists in different fields. There have not been changes for nationals from EFTA countries as well. For example, Croatian nationals can work in Switzerland from January 1st, 2022, with the same rights as the rest of the EU/EFTA countries. Croatian citizens in Switzerland made up 1.9% of all EU/EFTA nationals. Previously, under a Swiss-approved law, Croatians were permitted to work in Switzerland while subject to transitional provisions. Quotas were in place for Croats who wanted to live and work in Switzerland.

Work Permit for Croatian Nationals in 2022

This is one big piece of news for the year 2022. Croatian nationals will work in Switzerland from January 1st, 2022, with the same rights as the rest of the EU/EFTA countries. Croatian citizens in Switzerland made up 1.9% of all EU/EFTA nationals. Previously, under a Swiss-approved law, Croatians were permitted to work in Switzerland while subject to transitional provisions; this means quotas were in place for Croats who wanted to live and work in Switzerland.

Companies based in Switzerland that wanted to hire a Croat had to apply for a work permit and demonstrate that previous efforts to fill the position in Switzerland had been unsuccessful. Such regulations have been in effect since January 1st, 2017.

When Croatia joined the EU in 2013, the accession agreement provided the Member States with the option of implementing a seven-year transition period before allowing Croatian workers to work in their territory with the same rights as every European Union country. When Romania and Bulgaria joined the EU, they were subjected to a similar transition period.

The Permit Quotas for 2022

For 2022, the Swiss government has announced the following quotas: 4000 “L” short-term permits for non-EU/EFTA nationals, 4500 “B” long-term permits for non-EU/EFTA nationals, 3000 “L” short-term permits for EU/EFTA service providers/seconded workers, 500 “B” long-term permits for EU/EFTA service providers/seconded workers, 1400 “L” short-term permits for British nationals, 2100 “B” long-term permits for British citizens. Quotas for non-EU/EFTA nationals are released on a calendar-year basis, whereas service providers/seconded workers based in the EU/EFTA and UK nationals’ allocations are released quarterly.

What makes people from around the globe choose Switzerland to work or live for good? Well, there are several reasons.

Language 

Despite being a small country, Switzerland has four official languages: German, French, Italian, and Rhaeto-Romanic. It is a mandate that everything from the ingredient list on a grocery package to official government documents carries labels in three languages (German, French, and Italian).

The German-speaking Swiss speak a dialect of German, distinct from that of the Germans or Austrians, known as “Swiss-German” or “Schweizerdeutsch.”

Housing 

The Swiss housing market is difficult in some areas due to a lack of housing supply. Property prices for purchase and rental remain relatively high, particularly in urban areas.

You must be wondering how one can rent a home in Switzerland? Individual housing arrangements are made available using publicly obtainable resources. Though there are classified ads in local or regional newspapers, the information is available on the internet more often than not. You can find vacancies by subscribing to various dedicated websites. Still, communication may be limited because properties don’t always get advertised on the internet due to the short time between renters. Because properties typically get rented in a short period, we recommend acting quickly.

When we talk about purchasing real estate property, it is time-consuming and affects an individual’s tax situation. However, when buying land in Switzerland, it is best to seek the advice of a qualified real estate professional. These professionals can explain the various fees due upon purchase, such as transfer taxes, notary fees, and land register fees (approximately 6-7 percent of the purchase price should get budgeted for these fees).

The cost of living in Switzerland

If you plan to move to Switzerland on a work permit, mark up the package to cover the high cost of living. Zurich, for instance, is renowned as the world’s most expensive city, with Geneva coming in third. Make sure your pay is comparable to that of a Swiss citizen when you relocate to Switzerland. In general, average salaries in Switzerland are commensurate with the country’s high cost of living. If you’re moving to this beautiful country in the Alps on a pension, make sure it’ll be enough to support you.

Health Coverage

Furthermore, anyone arriving in Switzerland with the intent to stay for more than three months must obtain Swiss health insurance as soon as possible. They must ensure that health insurance covers them from the date of arrival. All Swiss residents must have health insurance, which gets organized privately. There are various plans and hence premiums on these insurances. So, it is preferred to do all the research related to health insurance price comparison and buy the insurance that fits your needs and has a low premium. Getting a health insurance quotes comparison in Switzerland will assist you in selecting the best one. 

Everyone living in Switzerland has access to adequate health care during sickness or emergencies. In general, health insurance in Switzerland covers the costs of outpatient treatment, doctors (general practitioners), hospitals, pharmacies, and so on. 

Conclusion 

Before shifting to a new place, you must consider numerous factors, ranging from cost-effective tax planning to permit laws to the best school for your children. Also, keep in mind that for the year 2022, there are no changes in the number of work permit quotas.